Exhibition/encounter Labyrinthe with Hertta Kiiski: Turku, Uittamontie 12, September 25th-October 10th 2021

19.10.2021

Sauli: Maybe we could open up a little bit the vision of Delfoi gallery that was supposed to open and how we came up with the solution to keep the artworks exhibited for the last month in the studio. The labyrinth reflects the goal of searching and wandering in an enclosed space and I also see it as a symbol for my artistic method. The artworks are not placed in clinical gallery space. What interests me is that there is something already in the space. My working is mostly intrusion and infiltration into different spaces and gradually all the elements merge with each other – adaptation and the search for a new form is in constant change. At this point, the labyrinth is your studio, where my artworks try to find their shape. Are we calling the event an exhibition or would it be some kind of encounter? 

Hertta: Yeah sounds really good. The word exhibition is easy for people to know what is promised, but encounter is probably closer to the right one. Delfoi was to become a window gallery but I had to cancel the agreed exhibitions when the space was suddenly sold to a new owner. The idea of a window gallery moves deeper into the space and your artwork meets my previous and unfinished artwork on the way again somewhere ahead.

Sauli: In the format of the window gallery, the challenge of the facade and the fact that the interior would have been inaccessible was fascinating. Now i’m able to access into the deep space you mentioned and my artworks have transformed into three-dimensional form. The window in my thoughts is now on the floor, just like a reflection of sunlight. Some of my artworks are transparent, so the ghost of the window is strongly present.

Hertta: The studio is such an intimate and private space where thoughts and materials develop into artworks, so it is fascinating and exciting to get visitors here in the form of both your artworks and people.

In front of Hertta Kiiski’s artwork: Facade (2021) laser print on glass-fibre, steel, wood (left)
Facade with a face (2021) concrete, paper, laser print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood,
plastic vehicle repair creeper (right)
Facade with a face (2021) concrete, paper, laser print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood,
plastic vehicle repair creeper
In front of Hertta Kiiski’s artwork: Facade without a face (2021) concrete, paper,
laser print on glass-fibre wallpaper, steel, wood
Facade without a face (2021) concrete, paper, laser print on glass-fibre wallpaper, steel, wood
Self-portrait (2021) concrete, paper
Labyrinthe (2021) concrete, paper, water beads
In front of Hertta Kiiski’s artwork: Imported by_denil (ghosts) (2019✝︎-2021) polaroids
Imported by_denil (ghosts) (2019✝︎-2021) polaroid
Imported by_denil (ghosts) (2019✝︎-2021) polaroid

AVANTGARDEN – SITE-SPECIFIC EXHIBITION AT NUOTTARANTA May 14 – 30th 2021

4.6.2021

Marjatta Holma, Hertta Kiiski, Ida Lehtonen, Anneli Nygren, Eeva-Maija Pulkkinen, Viivi Saikkonen, Sauli Sirviö, Anna Torkkel, Antti Turkko

Nuottaranta, located by the sea on Satava island in Turku, is a unique courtyard built on the basis of a Japanese garden and a villa that has never been open to the public. This spring during the time of the cherry blossoms a site-specific contemporary art exhibition AVANTGARDEN will take place there. 

The garden and the villa are the lifework of Jaakko Lindberg whose work as an art collector has provoked even conflicting reactions in the Finnish art world. The new owners of Nuottaranta are now renovating the long-neglected house and the garden surrounding it. During three weekends in late spring 2021 nine artists will spread their work over the site. 

AVANTGARDEN consists of site-specific installations, paintings, sculptures, photographs, videos, text-based works and a work-in-progress performance. The artworks interact with the place, its history and each other. Throughout the year open discussion and spending time at Nuottaranta have played an important role in the artists’ work process. Artists have also utilized materials found in the villa and garden. 

Over the years nature has taken over the garden but the vegetation and structures are still preserved. Nuottaranta is rich in rhododendrons, several magnolias and other rare plants originating from the traditional Japanese gardens. There are nine tea rooms, terraces, water themes and sculptural stone arrangements in the garden. Japanese influences can also be seen in the interior of the more than 200-square-meter villa designed by Aarne Ehojoki in the 1960s and expanded by Olavi Laisaari in the 1980s. The exhibition spreads both indoors and outdoors. 

The exhibition has been supported by the City of Turku.

somewhere (2021) peaked cap (found), basketball (found)
everywhere (2021) laser print on glass-fibre wallpaper, birch plywood, glass, paper, cardboard, spray paint
nowhere (2021) inkjet print on blueback paper, cardboard
where (2021) paper
there (2021) paper
here (2021) paper, plastic
anywhere (2021) gelatin silver print
elsewhere I (2021) paper, glass-fibre, steel mesh, spray paint

closed nod closed node cocoon

10.11.2020

Solo exhibition at SIC and release of a photography book “The Glitch Collector” (2020) 31.10.-29.11.2020.

The existence of art is often justified by saying that it helps us see the world in a new way. Our present moment (2020) is characterised by algorithms that condition us to experience only what we already recognise, understand and accept. In the midst of infinite access to information, our conceptions of the surrounding world are surprisingly difficult to change.

When I look at Sauli Sirviö’s artworks, I find myself thinking about the position of art in relation to these competing influences. Does art still have the ability to change our views on the world (if it ever did)?

Sirviö’s pieces seem to emanate from a time that could be defined as the past, but that is still present. A kind of transition, where the recent past and the future blend together in the now in a very particular way. This semblance of anachrony is especially available to experience in places that are left waiting for the time they are to make way for the new. They take possession of the present like a ghost. Partly forgotten, but refusing to leave before they have to.

The exhibition seems to illustrate a complex societal phenomenon without naming it or commenting on it directly. At the same time Sirviö appears to observe the nature of photography – what it is and what it can be. By deconstructing a photograph to its component parts (light, its effects on matter and time), he combines the mimetic character of the image with the materiality of its subjects. Like anachronistic places, the pieces refer to the past but there is also something of the future detectable in them. They are precipitating something.

Photography is well suited to the observation of time. A photograph can stop time. It can mix, shape and organise it. Yet the meaning of images has changed decisively in the course of the past decade. We produce an unprecedented amount of images, so looking at them is perhaps more difficult than before. Sirviö would seem to bring this change in looking to the fore, searching for an answer: How to show the world differently?

Text: Sakari Tervo , Translation: Maija Timonen

The exhibition is being supported by Olga and Vilho Linnamo Foundation and Arts Promotion Centre Finland.

“The Glitch Collector” (2020) is being supported by: Alfred Kordelin Foundation, Arts Promotion Centre Finland, Finnish Cultural Foundation and Finnish Cultural Institute in New York.

“Deorcnes” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood
Left to right: “Deorcnes” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood, “The Glitch Collector” (2020), “Repeat cancelled” (2020) paper, steel mesh, “Mirino” (2020) RST-plate, “Hand strap” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip, “Courroie de cou” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip, “Koskela Bulb III” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass, “Touch” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood,
“Koskela Bulb II” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass,
Left to right: “Deorcnes” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood, “Repeat cancelled” (2020) paper, steel mesh,
“The Glitch Collector” (2020, “Courroie de cou” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip, “Mirino” (2020) RST-plate, “Hand strap” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip
Mirino” (2020) RST-plate
Left to right: “Courroie de cou” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip, “Deorcnes” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood, “Repeat cancelled” (2020) paper, steel mesh
“Koskela Bulb” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass
Left to right: “Koskela Bulb III” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass, “Touch” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood,
“Hand strap” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip
Left to right: “Koskela Bulb III” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass “Touch” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood,
“Hand strap” (2020) silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip, “Koskela Bulb II” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass, “Courroie de cou” (2020), silver gelatine print, metal, magnet, wood, spray paint, pp-strap, plastic clip
“Repeat cancelled” (2020) paper, steel mesh
“Koskela Bulb” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass
Koskela Bulb III” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass
“Touch” (2020) inkjet print on glass-fibre wallpaper, wood
“Koskela Bulb II” (2020) cart, newsprint, glass
“The Glitch Collector” (2020)
Text and photography: Sauli Sirviö
Preface: Ilari Laamanen
Finnish-English translation: Maija Timonen
Graphic design: Rastapunka
Print: Livonia
ISBN 978-952-94-3839-6
500 copies